Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 32
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
, not by much but it's a very large city. it's not just the second city. so has been a place where many traders and manufacturers as well preferred because it was historically quite a vibrant or because it was far away from the center where they might have a bit more freedom, even though that margin of freedom was not wide. >> where are you from originally? >> i am lebanese, but my mother is sick and spent an lebanon supported history, correct? >> right spent is there a lot of trade between lebanon -- how would you describe lebanon's economy? >> it's going to take up to saturday because the lebanese economy is really very difficult to describe the nominally it's an open capitalist economy, but the kinds of networks and crony network, that exist in lebanon, turned this kind of seemingly open economy into peacetime and created the situation where is there difficult to move up, hence, many lebanese, many young men and women end up leaving the country to find jobs elsewhere. you see them in various places in the country is very small. so lebanese, the lebanese economy actually provided syria with t
's dozen large cities literally overnight. why didn't the numerous positive changes in indianapolis over the past 40 years, i see the fulfillment of the vision of then mayor dick lugar. not the midwest has a way of producing bad and the amended decency. none of us fall in that category. sometimes that sense is questioned, but we do have individuals who have the ability to see to the heart of the matter and find a way to resolve a problem. such scale is extremely valuable in the united states senate. a body by its very design is supposed to foster compromise between legislators on issues before the nation. and so it was a natural progression that following his success as mayor, dick lugar's next job would be serving hoosiers is the united states senator. since 1977, senator lugar has represented hoosiers have served our nation admirably. without question, senator lugar is the type of lawmakers later who works hard to bring both parties together, find common ground and pass the legislation. those contributions are many, including this fine valley service on the senate agriculture committee
. >> sure. >> it's a miami thing. >> that terrifies me, what that woman said. >> miami, large american city of two and a half million people located on florida's southern coast that has been clean and sober going on six weeks now. the center of finance and trade, miami will remain by the grace of god a substance redefinition -- destination for millions of tourists. mammy -- miami has spent every day in a haze of drug and alcohol. the city barely recall saw its most important moments including 1836 construction, incorporation as a city, or the suburban sprawl of the past 50 years which is pretty much just a blur. mamie cleaned up for bid in the late 1980's, but after the sudden appearance of hurricane andrew the city went on a monthlong cocaine bender finally hitting rock bottom with the collapse of 2008 when travois nearly everyone who cared about it. still, miami has a new outlook on life and will take it one day with the largest population of cubans in the estates of the time. >> dave barry. >> he does not exist. persist with there fantasy if you wish, but you are mentally ill and diluted
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
patriotic types, right wing. for the most part are completely groundless. in this community, in the city, veterans by and large were warmly embraced. when they had true problems, when they were in dire need and no one else is taking care of them, not their families, not their peashooter tapes. this san francisco to take care of these men. >> i really wanted to reinforce that david. the haight-ashbury clinic with its nonjudgmental approach, although that's in the 70s came to her clinic for detox and medical problems and the va decided they needed to find where ever the vets went and that is when the haight-ashbury got their first-ever government funding. government officials came across an wanted to give me money. i said last year you try to arrest me and i'd like to give me money. it was a vietnam vet. it has a very rich history. the head with glen ross whittaker came out a vietnam vet area, country joe and the fish. it really caught violence over here on haight streak come attack court came down. i can just see it right now they have this big shields. they beat the out of all the hippie
the vapor with a long sweep of his arms. mark twain had acquired a steam bath in virginia city. while laboring under bronchitis and a series called, 8 miles northwest from the road between virginia city and steamboat springs, a distance of 7 miles. over a long line of beautiful columns, there was a large house constructed to be then. [inaudible] gave me a boiling and surging noise exactly as a steam steamboat bed. sawyer traded and a hot mess. the boards were damp from the sweat running down his arms. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. new york engine company number 14. san francisco had grown and battled fire under chief david broderick and first fire chief. he served with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer in the mexican tea tray. mark twain, who held strong opinions perked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steamboat engineer. the question and the boy in the steamer environment, such a job, he said knowingly. in the boiling steam room, he pointed out the suffocating temperature of the furnace room in a narrow space between two rows of furnace
, and eight miles northwest, but the row between virginia city and steamboat swings and a distance of seven miles. over the first daylong line of 9 beautiful columns the bottom constricted large house debate in. he likened the jets of steam needed for fissures in the ears with steamboats. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat did. he enjoyed placing them in a handkerchief and dipping them where they would soft boiled in two minutes or hardboiled in four depending on this move. sawyer of luxuriated in the hot mist, answered his column, the cards which were murky, and the baseboards were damp and the fresh bottles of dark beer were cold. in his 32 years slayer had been a porche boy. in the new york fire engine co. no. 14. and the first fire chief. sawyer served with the other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer flying the mexican sea trade. mark twain perked up when sawyer mentioned he was a steamboat engineer. the journalists, and danny boy who dreamed of shipping as a steamer or fireman, such a job he said knowingly has little drawbacks and the boiling steam
city and steam boat springs -- a distance of 7 miles. over the first of a long line of nine beautiful columns, nevada cans had constructed a large house to bathe in. twain likened the jets of hot, white steam amid from fissures in the earth to a steam boat's escape pipes. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat did. he enjoyed placing eggs in his handkerchief and dipping them in the springs where they would soft boil in two minutes or or hard boil in four depending upon his mood. sawyer luxury rated in the hot mist and surveyed his cards which were murky in the haze. the pace boards were damp from the sweat running down his arms, but the fresh bottles of dark beer stall had sent in were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy in the new york fire engine company number 14 and in san francisco had run and battled fire for broderick 1 under chief david broderick, the city's first volunteer fire company and first fire chief. sawyer served with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer mying the mexicans -- plying the mexicans -- [inaudible] trade.
and advised all manners of clients in the real world of new york city. businesses, large and small, and individuals. as a true generalist, she has tried a wide variety of cases and her professional accomplishments and accolades are numerous, including serving as head of the litigation section, the largest section of the american bar association. she was, in fact, a pioneer in this position as the first asian-american to hold this prestigious post. second, on the point of moderation. when i mess miss schofield, i was struck -- met miss schofield, i was struck by the fact that she has one singular agenda -- the preservation of the rule of law. indeed, her professional work has been devoted to the general improvement of the practice of law and to zealously representing her clients in the best and most ethical traditions of the profession. evidence of her moderation can be found in the support she has across the political spectrum. both democrats and republicans have called notice tell me what a great -- me to tell me what a great judge she'll make. she's done everything from teaching
quiet they were largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south and went into another plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate t
largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south. the word out of one plantation began to another plantation. there were villages and towns and cities in the north come in and in the north people could read the slaves. there were opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and serve as apprentices and learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work was field hands, and then when it caught him chain was invented -- cotton shane was invented, you now have a sort of patrician of plantation owners. middle and lower-income people buying property and planting cotton. prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves compete for jobs. >> unlike most politicians he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. he was the first to stand up for emancipation and he led the fight throughout his congressional career which began after his presidency. he failed to be reelected and the presidency because he didn't have the common touch. he believed that there was beneath the d
, but the landscape is there now tells you that there was a creek they are. in other words, wherever there is a large sheet of land formerly in the city you'll find public or utilities, things considered at some point of lesser value. likewise since the creek on his story over at once was public housing, industrial warehouses, places where there's a ton of repair shops for taxicabs. the signs are written in numerous languages and also where people -- immigrants are storing their food carts. so it's a place -- that in itself, whereas the creek this practice wars come where things are constantly changing. new plants coming in constantly to nourish that saltmarsh gives us in the estuary. that is mimicked by the human settlement. so it still is a creek. i want to collect estuary i.t. of human development. there's this idea -- of course the city looks at these areas typically, especially in the last 10 years or so that this is an area that is not being used to its full potential. actually this is as if they were -- we were talking about college, but are trained creek is driving in the recently settled her
, obviously there are pros and cons. we miss living near new york city. obviously we had a severe crisis, which i hope we don't. i'm not sure that large population centers where somebody would want to be. obviously it would be unthinkable should happen. it's not why we moved, if there were a really bad attack of one type of another, we don't live in a concentrated area. there are advantages. >> we have been talking with thomas woods junior. the most recent book "rollback: repealing big government before the coming fiscal collapse." this is booktv on c-span2 on locations in las vegas. >>> booktv on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch viewers, get up-to-date information facebook.com/booktv. booktv sat down with philip auerswald to discuss his book "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy." he was in atense for the fall for the book festival held annually at the university. it's about a half an hour. >>> now joining us here at george maison university is professor philip auerswald. the most recent book is "the coming prosp
that came to be this political machine. but by and large it was run by these two guys. an irish man and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the city in the subtitle, fearless ethnics and political wizards, scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six pounds all together. it is troy, schenectady, its saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live. and to see. there's a lot to see. account is coming back. it's also a great, beautiful town. a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore people thought it had. >> on a recent visit to albany, new york, with the help of our partner time warner cable, booktv explored the literary and cultural atmosphere of the city. albany known as one of the most populous cities in the u.s. in 1810 is home to several institutions of higher living -- learning including the university of albany, stage and president of new york, a albany law school which is the fourth oldest law sch
, large like new york city, was pounded and pounded and pounded by this devastating hurricane. all america watched, we all held our breath, we all feared the worst, and we saw the worst. and, at the same time, we saw the indomitable spirit of the american people hanging onto their home, praying for their livelihood, and while all that was going on and the president visited, the governors on both sides of the aisle, to say you've got the united states of america behind you. well, the united states of america being behind you, whether you're governor o'malley or governor christie or governor cuomo or the other goafns means that we -- governors means that we need to pass this bill, and we want to pass it because we know that lives were devastated and livelihoods were ruined. in maryland, gosh, we faced these unique challenges -- hurricanes, blizzards, urban and rural communities affected. and our own lower shore, some somerset county was hit. that has one of the highest unemployment rates in the city -- in the state, close to 10%. 18% of the residents moved below a line of 35 $$35,000 a year.
waters eight miles northwest of the kiker green between virginia city and steamboat springs a distance miles. for the first of a long line of thing before columns they distracted a large custody then. same like and a hot wasting the mid from fishers in the earth tree steamboat this gave. they needed boiling, surging noise exactly is the steamboat to. he enjoyed facing exit his handkerchief and to demand the springs. they would in two minutes or hard oil and for depending upon his mood. sawyer luxuriated in hotmail and surveyed his cards, which were murky and the haze. the spores were damp from the sweat running down his arms. the fresh bottles of dirt simon were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. in engine company have run embattled fire for broader quad under david broderick from the city's volunteer fire come any in first fire chief. so your circuits other engine house is an toiled as the steamboat engineer, flying the mexican feature a. twain, who held strong opinions on stever's perked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steam vote engineer. the journalist
that there have been a lot of bullying going on and targeting of bullying here in new york city. one of the very early don't shoot that we did was around raising awareness. largely, it was a lot of the racism in the attacks that we were seeing in the wake of 9/11. and that the kids were being targeted, that it was a real affection of what was going on in our culture, that these people no longer felt safe. so it's a big picture. >> host: what i am hearing you say is that this is about creating a school climate that is safe for all kids. but all of the kids and adults in the school, at whatever level they are working are part of the solution. and that you can't just dismiss this as kids will be kids. or that, you know, tough it out. this is really about fundamental dignity. it is about, unfortunately, life and death. and i think that there are far too many young people losing their lives to bullying. due to suicide, suicide has been a wake-up call to all of us. your book and movie have a lot of resources in them. would you like to tell us about your resources that are available on your website? im
groundbreaking series coming sandman -- [cheers and applause] collected a large number of u.s. awards in its 75 issue run. i was a city hall and a young woman said to have every single one of those. including nine will eisner comic industry were simply heard heard the words. in 1991, the first comic i virtue received literary award for best short stories. he's also won the coveted two. a word. mr. gaiman is credited with being a creator of modern comics as well as some out there who's worked and reached audiences of all ages. he is listed in the dictionary of literary biography as a top 10 living postmodern writers and is a prolific writer of prose, poetry, film, journalism, comics, song lyrics and drama. it is a, please welcome me and give anyone fairfax and george mason welcome to mr. neil gaiman. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> there are an awful lot of view. [laughter] hello. right, so the plan for this evening. there is one. although i only decided what it was about four minutes ago. so there is a plan. the plan is as follows. i couldn't decide whether
to be this political machine. but by and large it was run during these two guys in a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city and the sub title, fearless as next and political wizard, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six townsel put together. it's story, schenectady, colony in saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live and to see. there's a lot to see you next time. it's also the beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have the reputation anymore i had. >> according to author mike lofgren, "the party is over." how the republicans are crazy, democrats became useless and the middle class that shafted. mr. lofgren, how did the republicans go crazy? >> well, they go crazy when they became an apocalyptic home that lives in its own bubble. we have seen not in the last election. they simply could not believe the public polls, what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and most d
. they were all part of this mosaic that came to be, this political machine. but by and large, it was run by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the the city that's in the subtitle; fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. and, but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no long orer just albany. albany, it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford white thought it had. >>
awareness and a lot of targeting of kids here in new york city. one of the very early film shoots we did was around a day where they were raising awareness about the bullying they were experiencing, and largely it was a lot of the racism and the attacks that we were seeing in the wake of 9/11 and the muslim kids were being targeted. the sikh kids and the muslim kids were being targeted and that was a real reflection of what was going on nationally in our culture and in our consciousness and communities where people know longer felt safe. so it is a big picture and i think that is why it's a tough nut to crack. >> host: it sure is. what i'm hearing you say is that this is about creating a school climate that is safe for all kids, that all the kids and the adults in the school, at whatever level they are working, report of the solution and you can't just dismiss this as kids will be kids you know, or toughen up. this is really about fundamental dignity and it's about unfortunately, it's about life and death with some kids. i think the ways -- far too many young people are losing their live
began. and a large community. a significant figure at that time given the population of the city. in poland this survive in all kinds of ways. many people survived by going to the soviet union command many people come home to find what is left to see what kind of live they made. one very bad and moving document can last many come home just to see the cemeteries and leave because they don't wanta be there anymore. but they come back. some try and make new lives there. some join the communist parties. the communist party as an attraction for -- a buddy who has experienced the devastation of the war, the shattering of all ethics and all morales lehigh, many people did see in communism a kind of alternative. there was a time, a very brief time when some people so they come back. and some really camino, it's a strange and cards started tell because sums on the communist party and some immediately come into conflict with the communist party because a lot of them are small traders are merchants.the. they then begin to be large groups. help train qc will fight for independence and palest
a large photo. but to run up and down the state to ocean city we had a four-lane bridge and we just replaced it. the old bridge is gone. it is amazing. five months ago we were using that bridge. as a major link. we experience widespread storm damage. we continue to work with officials to see the extent of our losses. preliminary assessments from connecticut and new jersey jersey, this will sound modest but we need between 7.5 and $9 million. for preparation, response and prepares. fish and wildlife service and army corps still has their own assessments but they tell us it will be tens of millions of dollars for repairs. this seems like a small number but with the state budget they will need assistance through fema. if an ounce of prevention is worth it is we must mitigate the effect of future storms. this is the recurring theme especially is climate change increases the severity of the coastal storm. the army corpshas built extra projects and in delaware and down the east coast in no small part to the separates they performed exceptionally well with billions of dollars of damages ri
. but, by and large, it was run by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's, it's the history of the city that's in the subtitle, fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. and we still have a lot of those. but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no longer just albany. it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and can there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town, and a lot of people know it know. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that fanford white thought it had. >> albany, new york, is one of the oldest surviving settlements from the original and colonies and the longest continuously-chartered city in the united states. next, we hear from jack casey. his book tells the story of katiri, a mohawk woman born in 1656 who was recently named the first native american to enter sainthood. >> well, lily of the mohawks is
of this mosaic that came to be this political machine but by and large it was run by the 2 guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city in the subtitle, fearless that makes, political wizards, underrated scoundrels, and we still have a lot of those, but it is a different town now, it is no longer just albany. it is about five or six tones all put together. saratoga is homely half an hour away. these are great places to live. pat and to see. there is a lot to see in this town. the town is coming back. it is a beautiful town. it is a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford might. >> on a recent visit to albany, n.y. with the help of time warner cable booktv explore the literary and cultural atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populous cities in the u.s. in 1810 is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state univ. of new york, the albany law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and
controversial as most things in america were. one who designed washington city, there is competition. he submitted the design for the palace. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. in fact come in 1821, a european diplomat told the congress that was neither large nor awe-inspiring. but the answer, the congressman gave said the building said his purpose, if were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent residents. >> a state department official testified regarding conflict in the democratic republic of the congo today at a congressional hearing. he said the obama administration is working closely with international part is to end the violent conflict between the congolese army and backed by rwanda. rebels captured the eastern congo city of goma. this is just two and a half hours. >> the committee will come to order. good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today will regard the policy in the democratic republic of congo. this conflict was exacerbated by rwanda's interventions in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the
not bomb from the air civilian targets and they didn't by and large. the liftoff had always said announcements and penalties for people who violated the strict instructions not to cause civilian damage until about a year into the war then made a navigation error, struck the city of london, the docks of london. churchill says, i'll show you how that works. the bomb our civilian targets, obama berlin. he bones milan. ... one, berlin is 100 on london. perot loses the war, but he destroys london's -- london from the air. and, of course, the british and the americans who had this was a war crime remembered that deal. by the end of the war, no one had the nerve to bring charges that nuremberg for the war crime of civilian bombing from the air . that tells us, i think, how even if we had in agreement with the other side of of cyber war have those laws would actually play out. we would not be able to contain a cyber war anymore than we could contain bombing from the air, which means that essentially we are engaged in a fool's errand to try and get legal norms on cyber war. it is not goin
was very controversial, as most things in america where. the designer of washington city, there was a competition. he submitted the design for a palace. it was not particularly on inspiring. in fact, in 1821, european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large nor on inspiring. the answer said -- the answer was the building served its purpose. perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> former new york times photo critic has gathered a few of for favre winehouse photos and the white house, the president's home and photographs in history. one sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on american history tv. >> senators chuck schumer and lamar alexander held a press briefing today on planning for next month's presidential inauguration. since 1901 the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies as irresponsible for the planning and execution of the swearing in ceremonies and a luncheon for the inauguration of the president at the u.s. capitol. >> welcome. let you're all here. this is the platform where the inauguration wi
over 40 schools in new york city that are destroyed, mostly by the water. roads, bridges, you name it. the devastation is everywhere, it is wide, it is deep. and so with this kind of devastation, even a large area like new york cannot handle it on its own. and fortunately, mr. president, we've had a wisdom here in this government for close to a century, and that is when nature strikes, when the hand of god comes down on earth and creates the kind of damage that man can't comprehend, that no locality can handle it on its own, and so the federal government steps in. which means the country as a whole steps in. and when there were hurricanes in louisiana and mississippi, the whole country stepped in. we said we know this is too much for to you handle alone. when there were forest fires out west, the whole country stepped in saying we know you can't handle this kind of devastation on your own. when there was flooding in the missouri and mississippi valleys, the same. the federal government came in. and we in new york, hundreds of millions, probably over the decades, billions of our tax do
and about box and the point i was trying to stress is i think the u.s. writ large, the government and also the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)